Articles

  • The Denationalization of American Muslims

    20 March 2017 by Peter Beinart

    On March 6, the zoning board in Bayonne, New Jersey, turned down a request to convert an old warehouse into a mosque. Such denials are happening with increasing frequency in the United States. In the 10 years between 2000 and 2010, the Justice Department intervened seven times against local communities that… Read more

    The Denationalization of American Muslims
  • Framing Racism: Why SBS’s FU2Racism Doesn't Get Race Right

    5 March 2017 by Yassir Morsi

    At the end of SBS’s Is Australia Racist? a marketeer tells host Ray Martin about the framing effect. It as a tool that media uses to manipulate the truth. To frame something is to lead someone; it is persuasion; it is propaganda. It sets the stage; it creates an emotive narrative; it entices. It directs us toward… Read more

    Framing Racism: Why SBS’s FU2Racism Doesn't Get Race Right
  • Teaching maths – what does the evidence say actually works?

    9 September 2016 by Claire Brown

    “I’m just so bad at maths!” Too often we hear that claim uttered in fear and frustration. It’s not just students who say this, but also their parents and, in some cases, their teachers, particularly in primary schools. Research on the topic of maths anxiety is inconclusive and scarce. But there are a few things we… Read more

    Teaching maths – what does the evidence say actually works?
  • Why Even Driving Through Suburbia Is Soul Crushing

    10 August 2016 by Alex Balashov

    I’ve written some in the past about how the predominant suburban design in the US is among the worst features of life here—viewed from the perspective of a European immigrant like me, at any rate. Far from posing a mere logistical or aesthetic problem, it shapes–or perhaps more accurately, it circumscribes–our… Read more

    Why Even Driving Through Suburbia Is Soul Crushing
  • An Illustrated Guide to Guy Debord’s ‘The Society of the Spectacle’

    10 August 2016 by Tiernan Morgan & Lauren Purje

    Guy Debord’s best-known work, La société du spectacle , is a polemical and prescient indictment of our image-saturated consumer culture. The book examines the “Spectacle,” Debord’s term for the everyday manifestation of capitalist-driven phenomena; advertising, television, film, and celebrity. Debord defines the… Read more

    An Illustrated Guide to Guy Debord’s ‘The Society of the Spectacle’
  • The Violence Of Forgiveness

    21 July 2016 by Mohamad Tabbaa & Claudia Maryam Sirdah

    ‘I’m talking about assuming the best in people … showing others radical generosity in the face of their hostility even when it hurts. This is the harder choice because it demands much more restraint and patience, and so much more strength.’ So advised Waleed Aly Tuesday night on popular television program, The… Read more

    The Violence Of Forgiveness
  • Universities Must Protect PhDs Doing Risky Fieldwork. Here’s How

    19 July 2016 by Corinna Howland and Christina Woolner

    Lots of PhD students find themselves doing long-term fieldwork in unfamiliar environments. This is a rewarding experience, but it also involves risk. There are all sorts of problems students can encounter: they might have difficulty dealing with local authorities, witness violence or criminal activity, they could… Read more

    Universities Must Protect PhDs Doing Risky Fieldwork. Here’s How
  • Brexit Demonstrates The Left’s Failure On Race Issues

    2 July 2016 by Alana Lentin & Mohamad Tabbaa

    In an article on race and British cultural studies, Roxy Harris noted that the field’s founders – E.P. Thompson and Raymond Williams – ignored “the place of black and brown British subjects in the national polity”. Thompson’s classic 1968 study, The Making of the English Working Class, for example, while covering… Read more

    Brexit Demonstrates The Left’s Failure On Race Issues
  • My Four Months As A Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 1

    1 July 2016 by Shane Bauer

    CHAPTER 1: Inmates Run This Bitch. Have you ever had a riot? I ask a recruiter from a prison run by the Corrections Corporation of America . The last riot we had was two years ago, he says over the phone. Yeah, but that was with the Puerto Ricans! says a woman’s voice, cutting in. We got rid of them. When can you… Read more

    My Four Months As A Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 1
  • My Four Months As A Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 2

    1 July 2016 by Shane Bauer

    Chapter 2: Prison Experiments. People say a lot of negative things about CCA, the head of training, Miss Blanchard, tells us. That we'll hire anybody. That we are scraping the bottom of the barrel. Which is not really true, but if you come here and you breathing and you got a valid driver’s license and you willing… Read more

    My Four Months As A Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 2
  • My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 3

    1 July 2016 by Shane Bauer

    Chapter 3: The CCA Way. It’s the end of December, and I come in at 6 a.m. for my first of three days of on-the-job training, the final step before I become a full-fledged CO. The captain tells an officer to take me to Elm. We move slowly down the walk. One word of advice I would give you is never take this job… Read more

    My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 3
  • My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 4

    1 July 2016 by Shane Bauer

    Chapter 4: You Got to Survive. There is a looming sense of crisis at Winn. Shortly after Cortez escaped, the warden decreed that the security staff should meet at the start of every shift. So at 6 a.m. each day, everyone is shepherded into a conference room, where they brood over coffee and Monster Energy drinks… Read more

    My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 4
  • My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 5

    1 July 2016 by Shane Bauer

    Chapter 5: Lockdown. On my fifth week on the job, I'm asked to train a new cadet. He is a short white man in his 40s with peppered black hair. He says he worked as a security contractor in Iraq and Afghanistan for Triple Canopy and Blackwater. He is hoping to go back to Afghanistan soon. I had terrorists who blew… Read more

    My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard -- Ch. 5
  • Michel Foucault, Prisons And The Future Of Abolition: An Interview

    25 June 2016 by Eugene Wolters

    “Active Intolerance: Michel Foucault, the Prisons Information Group, and the Future of Abolition” explores the Prison Information Group , an organization founded by notable academics, including Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze, to expose the deplorable conditions of the French Prison system. “Little information… Read more

    Michel Foucault, Prisons And The Future Of Abolition: An Interview
  • Naomi Klein On The Racism That Underlies Climate Change Inaction

    25 June 2016 by Naomi Klein

    In recent months, the world’s gaze has landed again and again on a hellish Australian terrain of climate-related disaster. Bushfires ravage some of the planet’s oldest trees in Tasmania. Catastrophic coral bleaching leaves much of the Great Barrier Reef a ghostly white. The first known mammal to be wiped out by… Read more

    Naomi Klein On The Racism That Underlies Climate Change Inaction
  • The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile

    12 May 2016 by Ella Morton

    There’s a fearsome fence surrounding the Miles Brewton House in Charleston, South Carolina. Its wrought-iron rails are topped with a cheval de frise, a horizontal bar covered in long spikes that jut out at multiple angles. Added in response to a planned slave revolt in 1822, the spiky bar sends a clear message:… Read more

    The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile
  • How Tuberculosis Shaped Victorian Fashion

    11 May 2016 by Emily Mullin

    The deadly disease—and later efforts to control it—influenced trends for decades. Marie Duplessis, French courtesan and Parisian celebrity, was a striking Victorian beauty. In her best-known portrait, by Édouard Viénot, her glossy black hair frames a beautiful, oval face with sparkling eyes and ivory skin. But… Read more

    How Tuberculosis Shaped Victorian Fashion
  • Attention, Students: Put Your Laptops Away

    17 April 2016 by James Doubek

    As laptops become smaller and more ubiquitous, and with the advent of tablets, the idea of taking notes by hand just seems old-fashioned to many students today. Typing your notes is faster — which comes in handy when there’s a lot of information to take down. But it turns out there are still advantages to doing… Read more

    Attention, Students: Put Your Laptops Away
  • Universities Are Becoming Billion-Dollar Hedge Funds With Schools Attached

    8 March 2016 by Astra Taylor

    Have you heard the latest wisecrack about Harvard? People are calling it a hedge fund with a university attached. They have a point—Harvard stands at the troubling intersection between higher education and high finance, with over 15 percent of its massive $38 billion endowment invested in hedge funds. That… Read more

    Universities Are Becoming Billion-Dollar Hedge Funds With Schools Attached
  • The Terror Of Responsibility: Are Terrorists Criminals?

    13 October 2015 by Mohamad Tabbaa

    Another attack, another cycle of media commentary, accusations, counter-claims, condemnations and confusion. While it has almost become a repetitive ritual to many of us, it is the way that we respond in the aftermath of terror or Muslim violence and the unforeseen consequences of those responses that bear… Read more

    The Terror Of Responsibility: Are Terrorists Criminals?
  • The Varieties Of Exception

    11 October 2015 by Jeffrey Jurgens

    “The best criterion by which to decide whether someone has been forced outside the pale of the law is to ask if he would benefit by committing a crime. If a small burglary is likely to improve his legal position, at least temporarily, one may be sure he has been deprived of human rights. For then a criminal… Read more

    The Varieties Of Exception
  • Representation: An Introduction

    5 October 2015 by Jodie Taylor

    Introduction. In this lesson, we will explore the concept of representation as it relates to the production and consumption of mediated messages. Representation refers to the construction in any medium of aspects of ‘reality’ such as people, emotions, experiences, places, objects, events, cultural identities and… Read more

    Representation: An Introduction
  • Wither ISIS: What Do Islamophobes Really Want?

    14 March 2015 by Mohamad Tabbaa

    A recent essay in The Atlantic caused a stir by suggesting – contrary to constant pleas by Muslims – that in fact ISIS was not only Islamic, but very much so. Given its constant references to and reliance on the Quran and other Islamic texts, author Graeme Wood suggests groups like ISIS are the most authentic… Read more

    Wither ISIS: What Do Islamophobes Really Want?
  • Where Exactly Are We Riding?

    18 December 2014 by Mohamad Tabbaa

    In the aftermath of the heart-wrenching scenes from the Martin Place siege, a heart-warming initiative took the world by storm. The Illridewithyou campaign took off when a stranger offered to accompany a Muslim woman in public to comfort and protect her from the inevitable violent backlash that follows such… Read more

    Where Exactly Are We Riding?
  • Tolerance Is Bigotry’s Counterpart In Keeping Muslims Divided

    26 August 2014 by Mohamad Tabbaa

    Everyone knows the game. It’s called “asking the Muslim question”. We’ve been playing it a lot this year. Can Muslims be trusted with a mosque in Bendigo? Are Muslims who travel overseas going to fight as terrorists? Are they Australian if they are prepared to speak about “honour” killings? Do Muslims turn the… Read more

    Tolerance Is Bigotry’s Counterpart In Keeping Muslims Divided
  • ISIS: The Gift That Keeps On Giving

    18 August 2014 by Mohamad Tabbaa

    Recently, 3AW Radio host Tom Elliot conducted a chilling interview with military commander of ISIS, Omar Shishani. In it, Shishani tells Elliot that “anybody who makes problemswill get crucified”, as well as describing convicted terrorist Khaled Sharrouf, who recently caused outrage after posting a picture of his… Read more

    ISIS: The Gift That Keeps On Giving
  • Unholy Discourse Clouds Debate On Australians Fighting In Syria

    18 July 2014 by Martin McKenzie-Murray

    Does silencing dissent at home serve to encourage Muslim Australians to embrace jihad? Ben “Ballistic” Meadows skipped imperiously towards the ring, draped in an Australian flag, buoyed by the strains of gangsta rap. But the battle cries of DMX blasting from the arena’s PA system were no match for the booing crowd… Read more

    Unholy Discourse Clouds Debate On Australians Fighting In Syria
  • Disguising Islamophobia

    9 May 2013 by Mohamad Tabbaa & Yassir Morsi

    What do a conservative leader and a radical feminist have in common? More than we would have guessed, it seems. Recently an Islamic group held an event at the University of Melbourne. The seating was arranged according to gender, as is common with such events. A reporter from The Australian newspaper attended the… Read more

    Disguising Islamophobia
  • Why Do Muslims Hate Freedom of Speech?

    20 February 2013 by Mohamad Tabbaa

    This question is becoming increasingly common in many parts of the world, and has been raised recently in Australia in regards to the anti-Muslim film of 2012. It is now again rearing its head with the presence of far-right and anti-Islam Dutch politician Geert Wilders, who is in the country for his speaking tour… Read more

    Why Do Muslims Hate Freedom of Speech?
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